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Group Info Group Founded 6 Years ago Statistics 1,750 Members
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Group Information - READ BEFORE JOINING

MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION
:bulletpurple: All Pagans and those interested in Paganism are welcome.
:bulletpurple: If you wish to join this group, please select "Members" as you do so. When you click on a rank to join our group, you are applying to join that rank.
:bulletpurple: Requests to join as part of "Members" are automatically approved by the system. Applications to join higher ranks must be approved by group admins.
:bulletpurple: Art submissions, on the other hand, are subject to a vote by the admins.
:bulletpurple: If you have a group and want it to affiliate with ours, please send us a reason why you want to affiliate with us along with your affiliation request.

MEMBERSHIP RULES
:bulletpurple: Be respectful to one another. We do not condone hate, prejudice or disrespect in any form. This includes expressions of hate in art.

ART RULES
:bulletpurple: The focus of all artwork submitted to this group must remain within the scope of real-world Paganism. We will not accept work that does not contain elements of Paganism, or if the focus of which is overshadowed by irrelevant subjects.
:bulletpurple: PaganArts is not a group for fantasy artwork. The magick we weave is real.
:bulletpurple: Art with mature content must have Mature Content tags. We won't accept it without them.
:bulletpurple: Submit artwork to their proper folders. Misplaced submissions will be rejected! Review all your options before you make a decision! See our folder directory below.
:bulletpurple: Please do not submit artwork to our Favorites section. If you submit artwork to our group's Favorites section, it will be rejected and replaced with a counter-request for submission to our main gallery.
:bulletpurple: There is a two submission per day limit for every folder.
:bulletpurple: Direct submissions to the Featured folder are not allowed (nor are they possible). (See Weekly Top Four Nomination Information for clarification.)

FOLDER DIRECTORY
Below is a complete directory of all our folders in this gallery. Here at PaganArts, we encourage our members to submit their art to folders based on subject matter over the type of medium used in its creation. For example, if you have an acrylic painting of Thor, we encourage you to submit it to Gods instead of Traditional Media. With this folder directory, there's no reason to misplace a submission.

:bulletpurple: FEATURED: Reserved for our Weekly Top Four program. The only way to get artwork into this folder is to nominate it via group note.
:bulletpurple: TRADITIONAL MEDIA: Two-dimensional artwork done with tangible media, such as pencil sketches or acrylic paintings, that do not fit into any other folder. Traditional Media is not a catch-all folder. Do not dump all of your artwork here.
:bulletpurple: DIGITAL MEDIA: 2D or 3D artwork completed from scratch mostly using a computer or some other electronic means. This folder is reserved for digital media that does not fit into any other folder.
:bulletpurple: PHOTOMANIPULATION: Collages or photographs dramatically altered to appear different from the original snapshots. This folder is reserved for collages or photomanipulations that do not fit into any other folder.
:bulletpurple: PHOTOGRAPHY: Photographs taken with minimal enhancements. This folder is reserved for photographs that do not fit into any other folder.
:bulletpurple: CRAFTS: Tangible three-dimensional artwork or trinkets. Not for ritual tools, talismans, or any component in altar setups.
:bulletpurple: DIVINATION: Photography, artwork, or literature depicting runes, tarot, zodiac signs, or any other tools or methods used to contact the supernatural.
:bulletpurple: POETRY AND PROSE: General literature of a Pagan nature. Not for posting spells, rituals, invocations, or correspondence charts.
:bulletpurple: SPELLS AND INVOCATIONS: Photographs, artwork, instructions, and recipes for prayers, chants, potions, tinctures, and other practical magick.
:bulletpurple: FAERIE REALM: Photographs, artwork, and literature depicting the Fey folk.
:bulletpurple: ANIMAL TOTEMS AND SPIRIT GUIDES: Photographs, artwork, and literature depicting the animal kingdom and the spirit world. Anthropomorphic or "furry" animals are welcome here, as long as they're pagan.
:bulletpurple: MYTHOLOGICAL CREATURES: Photographs, artwork, and literature depicting all manner of legendary beasts.
:bulletpurple: GODS: Photographs, artwork, or literature depicting masculine deities.
:bulletpurple: GODDESSES: Photographs, artwork, or literature depicting feminine deities.
:bulletpurple: ALTARS AND SACRED SPACE: Photographs of your personal or group altars or the sacred space you use regularly for spells, rituals, or ceremonies.
:bulletpurple: RITUAL TOOLS: Photographs of the tools you use in spellwork, rituals, or ceremonies.
:bulletpurple: RITUALS: Photographs, artwork, and literature of spells in action, ritual proceedings, or ritual instructions.
:bulletpurple: STAMPS AND OTHER MISCELLANEA: Miscellaneous artwork not fitting into any other category. Best reserved for Deviant Stamps to show off your Pagan pride!

WEEKLY TOP FOUR NOMINATION INFORMATION
As stated above, direct submissions to the Featured folder are not possible, but you can nominate artwork to be featured. Here are some rules and guidelines to consider.
:bulletpurple: Every Monday, four submissions from different folders in our gallery will be chosen from among nominees to be featured on our front page for one week.
:bulletpurple: Be sure to check the 16 most recent submissions from the Featured folder before making any nominations.
:bulletpurple: No artist can have their work featured on the front page more than once in four weeks.
:bulletpurple: You may nominate your own artwork, but we encourage you to be generous and nominate the works of others.
:bulletpurple: You may nominate as much artwork as you wish, but please don't nominate any given piece more than once per week. Spamming our inbox will not help your nominee.
:bulletpurple: To nominate artwork, simply send a note to the group with a link to your nominations.
:bulletpurple: Any artwork nominated must already be in our group's gallery.

Group Info

We're a Pagan friendly club looking to share and promote artwork with a Pagan theme.
Group
Founded 6 Years ago
Feb 22, 2009

Location
Global

Group Focus
Common Interest

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Glad Yule to you all!

I thought it'd be a great opportunity to re-share some information packed blogs from the past. Written with special attention paid to the Northern Tradition (i.e. those pagan traditions that originate from ancient Germania, Scandinavia and Anglo-Saxon England that shared a common worship to the God Odin).

:bulletred: The Yuletide:bulletred:

If you’ve ever heard the Christmas Carol “The Twelve Days of Christmas” modern heathens opt to celebrate this as the Twelve Days of Yule, with the last day culminating on 12th Night. Since ancient calendars followed a different method of time, the solstice celebrations as well as later ‘Christmasy’ style observances can vary from place to place as to when they occur. Today, most pagans and heathens celebrate the yuletide as running from approximately December 20 – December 31 (but there are variations).

We do know that the celebration of Yule wasn’t always twelve days long. In the Norse text Heimskringla: The Saga of Hakon the Good talks about it once lasting for three days, or as long as the ale lasted. The night it began was known as the slaughter night, where animals would be ritually slain. Their meat later used to feed the community, as well as the Gods.  It was King Hakon of Norway, who as a Christian passed a law that the Christian Christmas Day (which was already a weird bastardization of the Christian story of the Nativity and Saturnalia/Mithraic customs) AND the pagan yuletide celebrations were to henceforth be celebrated at the same time. While this only specifically impacted Norway (and its territories), it illustrates an intentional combining of the holy-days into one celebration.

Today, the high holy tide is celebrated for twelve days. Whether this was because in some areas it was celebrated for that long originally, or was perhaps some odd creation that came from blending old pagan time-keeping methods and calendars with the modern ones together the end result is the same.

It is customary that NO work is done during the yuletide. From Germanic sources we see stories of the Goddess Berchta punishing those who had left work undone. In the Icelandic Svarfdæla saga, we see a warrior who postpones a fight until after the Yuletide. The Saga of Hakon the Good also speaks that the Yule was to be kept holy. For this reason some Heathen groups opt to conduct no business matters during the time of yule. Some practitioners of the Northern Tradition will even opt to completely withdraw and go incommunicado from online mailing lists, bulletin boards, and social media outlets like facebook so they can stay focused on spending the yuletide with friends and family. While it’s not always an option for everyone, there are those who choose to use vacation time from work so they can have the entire yuletide off as well.

:bulletred: Mother’s Night:bulletred:

The modern yuletide usually begins for most Heathens with Mother’s Night. In Bede’s De Temporum Ratione he describes what he knows about an old Anglo-Saxon celebration that he states was called Módraniht, which marked the beginning of a new year and was celebrated at the time of Christmas. Apparently Mother’s Night was observed the entire evening through.  While little information exists to describe what Mother’s Night was, by looking at the Northern Tradition umbrella we see what appear to be similar rituals. While Yule marks the start of the year for the Anglo-Saxons, we see in Scandinavia that this distinction was at least for some geo-specific locations given to Winter Nights, which had a separate observed ritual to the Disir as part of their celebration. The disir can be understood to be the ancestral mothers, and other female spirits that oversee the family, clan, or tribe. When we reach back to ancient Germania, we also see a thriving cultus dedicated to the “matrons” or the Idis. Female deities are also sometimes included with the disir.

I personally theorize that Saint Lucia’s Day (celebrated primarily in Scandinavian countries, especially Sweden) occurs on December 13th and features a female ‘light-bringer’ may be a Christianized remnant of an ancient disir-related ritual. The Christianized Saint Lucia Day, may have pagan origins related to the figure of Lussi. The practice of Lussevaka – to stay awake through Lussinatt to guard oneself and the household against evil, not only fits symbolically well with a solstice celebration of longest night, but also brings to mind the description of Mother’s Night being observed for the entire night as well.

:bulletred:Twelfth Night & Wassail:bulletred:

Yuletide festivities conclude on Twelfth Night. Many modern Heathens will sync this with New Year’s Eve. It’s the last big party to celebrate a new year, celebrate the passing of the darkest (and in theory coldest of times) and to look forward to the lengthening days and warming temperatures. Of all the nights of Yule, this night seems to be the one most closely associated with the custom of wassailing, which embodies in part the customs around caroling as well.

Wassail, Hail, Heilsa, are all different versions of the same root word across a few different languages (Old German, Old Norse, Old English), which essentially relates to health, prosperity and luck, and was used prominently as a type of salutation. Just as some Pagans and Wiccans may greet others with the phrase Blessed Be, many Heathens choose to use Hail as a greeting to their fellow believers. While this term may seem to be antiquated, or specialized to a religion in it’s use, it’s also used in other ways. For instance, the President of the United States has a 'theme song' that is played as he makes his 'entrance' into many of his public appearances, the song is titled "Hail to the Chief" which colloquially means 'greetings and good health to the chief/president'. It's actually really common in many schools (college or high school) fight songs as well, like Purdue University. Of course the most infamous example of its usage comes to us from Nazi Germany’s “Heil Hitler.”

Not only does the term mean health, but it became intimately linked at sometime in the distant pass with a special type of drink that was imbibed for one’s health. Today, we know this as the wassail beverage (as it survives to us among the English customs, though I imagine the German Gluhwein is similar in nature as well). This drink would vary by household (in much the way that there are a variety of different recipes for sangria) but it was meant to be an alcoholic beverage with some fruit juices in it and other herbs and seasonings to help fortify the health of all who imbibed it for the year ahead.

If you’ve ever heard the Christmas carol “Here we come a wassailing among the eaves of green” that’s where the tradition comes from– the wishing of good health and the drinking of wassail during the yuletide celebrations. In some specific areas, those from lower socio-economic tiers would go singing to those of greater wealth, and the higher socio-economic households were supposed to give wassail to the carolers. We also see a number of folk-traditions that show not only songs sung in ancient yuletide celebrations, but also that people sometimes went into the orchards or fields and sang, no doubt asking for the land’s fertility and that the plants would reawaken from winter slumber in the time ahead to feed and sustain us once more.

:bulletred: To read more about the 12 Days of Yule, check out the link paganarts.deviantart.com/journ… :bulletred:

:bulletred: Read about the pagan origins to the Santa Claus Mythos, as well as it's connection to the Wild Hunt paganarts.deviantart.com/journ… :bulletred:
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Comments


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:iconkiardra:
Kiardra Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013  Student Artisan Crafter
Thank you for requesting my work! I'm glad you found it good enough
Reply
:icontheperian:
theperian Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you for the request! :heart:
Reply
:iconfunnelvortex:
FunnelVortex Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
I have a few questions.


What is the definition of pagan?

Can an atheist be pagan?

How many times have you been attacked by religious fundamentalists?

How do you react to the negative pagan stereotypes? (anything from being stereotyped as crystal-humping vegannazis to satanic witches)


Answer these please.
Reply
:iconchaosfay:
ChaosFay Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
1) Pagan used to me "non christian" but now it's expanded to those who follow a different route related to the worship of multiple gods, or just a goddess, spirit work, and various other things. Overall it encompasses many things but relates mostly to the worship of a goddess in some measure.

2) Atheists believe there is no god, and Paganism involves the worship of a god/goddess. So no, atheism is not related.

3) Being attacked...well, it varies from person to person. Some people aren't "out of the broom closet" or keep their faith on the down low. Others are more forward and don't care how many people know what they practice.

4) Again, this varies from person to person.

Thank you for your questions. I recommend that you interview people more individually to get more expansion on the answers. Feel free to ask more questions so we can educate you if you wish.
Reply
:iconhemphat:
HempHat Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Just came across this and have to ask, why do some pagans only worship a goddess?
Reply
:iconchaosfay:
ChaosFay Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2013  Professional Artisan Crafter
We don't. I worship both a god and a goddess. Some only worship a goddess. Why do christians only worship a god?
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconfunnelvortex:
FunnelVortex Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
I was wondering, because I thought pagan just meant non-christian.
Reply
:iconchaosfay:
ChaosFay Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
That's what it used to mean, but now it's been taken further to mean a specific genre of belief. Much like "christian" can mean baptist, catholic, evangelical, etc.
Reply
:iconsnazzie-designz:
snazzie-designz Featured By Owner Dec 21, 2012   General Artist
Happy winter solstice everyone :D Out with the old, in with the new :D
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:iconfunnelvortex:
FunnelVortex Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
Yeah. But it sure was funny how those people thought the world was gonna end!
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